QUESTIONS ABOUT DIGITAL RESOURCES

  • How do I get into L-S Library databases from home (or somewhere that isn’t L-S)?
  • How can I access audiobooks?
  • How can I get into the JSTOR database?

Linking into the databases works the same from home and school. However, at home you need a password to access database content.

First go to this document and enter your L-S Google username and password. Look on the list for the password of the database you want to use.

Go to the LSRHS Library website and click the link for the database you want to access. When prompted, type the password you found on the Google document. Now you should be able to use the database.

The L-S Library itself does not have audiobooks in its collection. However, several online institutions provide free audiobook downloads. Here are our suggestions of places to search for free audiobooks:

Boston Public Library (need a BPL eCard or physical BPL library card  as well as your PIN to access these)

Minuteman Library Network (need MLN library card number and PIN to access these)

Project Gutenberg

Librivox

If you need help downloading audiobooks to your device, please let an L-S Library staff person know. We would be glad to help.

JSTOR is available through the Boston Public Library (BPL). Please read the following instructions carefully.

If you already have a BPL eCard or a physical BPL card, then go to BPL’s Electronic Resources page and click JSTOR. When prompted, enter your BPL ecard or BPL library card info.

If you do not have a BPL eCard or a physical BPL card, then sign up for a BPL eCard. After you have signed up, then go to the Electronic Resources page and click JSTOR. Use the number that was emailed to you along with the PIN you chose to access it.

QUESTIONS ABOUT BOOKS

  • How do I check out a book in the L-S Library? How long can I keep it?
  • Do you charge fines for late books?
  • How can I access audiobooks?
  • Do you take suggestions?

Get your book(s) off the shelf (if you need help, just ask). Once you’re set, go to any library desk. Present your L-S ID or give us your name. We’ll look you up and check out the book(s) for you.

You can keep most books up to 2 weeks. If no one else is waiting for the book, we will gladly renew it for you (so you can keep it an additional 2 weeks). For certain projects, particular book checkout times are shortened or lengthened.

No, the L-S Library does not charge fines. However, if you damage or lose a book, then you will have to pay for the cost of the book.

The L-S Library itself does not have audiobooks in its collection. However, several online institutions provide free audiobook downloads. Here are our suggestions of places to search for free audiobooks:

Boston Public Library (need a BPL eCard or physical BPL library card  as well as your PIN to access these)

Minuteman Library Network (need MLN library card number and PIN to access these)

Project Gutenberg

Librivox

If you need help downloading audiobooks to your device, please let an L-S Library staff person know. We would be glad to help.

Yes, we have a suggestion box located near the YA New Books section. We are especially interested to know how we can improve your library experience and what books you would like our library to carry.

QUESTIONS ABOUT LIBRARY PROCEDURES AND RULES
Students’ Questions

  • Why aren’t we allowed to enter or exit through the classroom door?
  • Why can't we pull chairs over from other tables?
  • Why do we have to use the charging stations individually (and our friends can't sit with us)?

At the library door, there is a gate which counts people as they enter (using an invisible laser beam). We like to have a fairly accurate count of everyone who uses the library, so we require that you enter through the library door instead of the classroom door.

The short answer: This rule–“Don’t pull chairs over to add seating”–gives students the ability to work in groups while generally keeping the overall noise level at an acceptable level. It also keeps library staff and students from having to search for stray chairs.

The long answer: There is a history behind this rule. If you really want to know more, then please read on…

Our library has an average of 1400 visits each day (with 2-4 staff members supervising). Our goal is to provide a safe, welcoming place to study and research; we provide guidelines to meet this goal. Among the rules is “Don’t pull chairs over to add seating.” Prior to adding this rule (or an older version of it), we would sometimes allow 5 or 6 students who were studying quietly to sit together.

Unfortunately, some students misused this privilege, taking the opportunity to invite more students to socialize or sitting 7 or more to a table. These behaviors often created a distraction, caused some students to feel that they were treated unfairly in relation to others, set the tone for a more chaotic atmosphere, and/or would take up a table needed by those who wished to study or read. Despite library staff’s efforts to address these issues with the individuals involved, we were at a point where supervising our space became problematic, taking more time and energy than it should. We determined that it would serve everyone better to use the seating arrangements as they were designed to be used rather than constantly negotiating the terms of library seating.

We have found–and teachers who help to supervise the library space agree–that this change has been positive. Here are some results:

  • The library has become a more useful, calm study and research space for everyone.
  • Increased positive interactions between library staff (or teachers) and students (a more respectful culture).
  • Library rules are applied more consistently and fairly to all students.
  • Clear enforcement of the rules gives students a better understanding of expectations.
  • Our staff and teachers who help in the library can more easily supervise students, ensuring a safe and productive study environment.
  • Library staff has more availability to provide services such as helping students research or select recreational reading.

Our library does not have many electrical outlets, so we set up 2 charging stations for students to charge their devices while using them. To keep our new charging station outlets available to students who need to charge, we ask that only individual students who need to power their devices use the charging stations. For example, if a student needs to charge and sits at the charging station with 2-3 friends (who don’t need to charge), then other students who need to charge will not feel comfortable joining that table.

We realize that this situation is not ideal, but we hope that having access to these additional outlets for charging is a useful convenience for L-S students. We wish that we could offer charging at each table so that we did not have to monitor the use of charging stations, but unfortunately multiple outlets cannot be installed through the library floor. Thank you for your understanding.

Teachers’ Questions

  • How do I reserve the library for my class?
  • How do I reserve the library for use as a computer lab space?
  • How do I reserve the library for a non-class need during school or outside operating hours?

Teachers are encouraged to collaborate with librarians when preparing research projects, so that librarians have an opportunity to provide input about resources and instruction. To schedule library instruction and reserve the classroom/computers:

  1. 1) Check iPass Room Use Viewer for availability of B323 Library & Classroom.
  2. 2) To reserve: Visit us in the library, email library@lsrhs.net, or call ext. 3395. To prevent confusion, please do not email individuals on the library staff for reservations. For more information, refer to our Library Reservation Guidelines (section A).

If you are strictly seeking a lab space (vs. reserving for a library collaborative project), then please seek available space in computer labs first. Library computers are used by students throughout the day for school work and these students will be displaced by any computer reservations. If you cannot find space in a dedicated computer lab, then you may reserve the library following the “48 hour rule.” Within 48 hours* of the time needed, anyone may request a library classroom reservation by emailing library@lsrhs.net, calling ext. 3395, or talking in person to a library staff member.

*48 Hour Rule Request Timing
As of 7.00 a.m. two days before the class in question.
          Friday –> Monday blocks
          Monday –> Tuesday & Wednesday blocks
          Tuesday –> Thursday blocks
          Wednesday –> Friday blocks

For more information, refer to our Library Reservation Guidelines (section B).

Please refer to our Library Reservation Guidelines. Specifically, see sections B and C.